Leyendo “La Bibliotecaria de Basora” de Jeanette Winter

Alia Muhammad Baker es la bibliotecaria de Basora. Durante 14 años su biblioteca fue un lugar de encuentro para todos aquellos que aman los libros. Hasta que empezó la invasión de Iraq.

Esta es una historia real acerca de la lucha de la bibliotecaria por salvar el valioso fondo de la biblioteca y que nos recuerda a todos que, en el mundo entero, el amor por la literatura y el respeto por el conocimiento no conocen fronteras.

Un libro basado en una historia real y actual (recogida en el año 2003 por el New York Times).

http://www.editorialjuventud.es/3582.html

The Books of Iraq

Source: http://www.muslimheritage.com/article/fate-manuscripts-iraq-and-elsewhere

Facade of the National Library and National Archives, Baghdad in June 2003. From Report by- Jean-Marie Arnoult, “Assessment of Iraqi cultural heritage Libraries and Archives” (mission in Baghdad in June 27-July 6, 2003)
BAGHDAD, IRAQ – APRIL 22: Remains of desks and filing cabinets stand in the charred ruins of the Iraqi National Library April 22, 2003 in Baghdad, Iraq. The National Library of Iraq was looted and then burned in the first days after the fall of Baghdad. It is estimated that thousands of historic documents were destroyed during this time, but the exact number and location of many documents remains unknown. Thousands of books that were not destroyed were removed by muslim clerics and secreted to different locations. (Photo by Roger Lemoyne/Getty Images)
April 8, 2003. In a hurry to steal the shelves from the library at the Basra Polytecnic College, a looter throws books into the aisle. An allied bomb or missile strike blasted a hole in the ceiling during the battle to drive Iraqi army snipers and mortar crews off the campus. With the Iraqi regime on the run there’s little or no civil control in Basra. Thousands of locals looted the entire school today. (Photo by Don Bartletti/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)


Actualización: Nos ha llegado esto hoy.

Alia’s Mission: Saving the books of Iraq – by Mark Alan Stamaty